The ten best things about having a home birth

Krysia Lynch, Coordinator, Home Birth Association of Ireland home birth blogger at homebirthireland.com and home birth mum gives us her top ten reasons why home birth rocks!

  1. You get to know your carer and you get continuity of care from the first visit in early pregnancy to the last visit up to six weeks after your baby is born. Most visits from your midwife will last over an hour and maybe as much as two hours. Most midwives include your other children in the antenatal visits and like to get to know you as a family. Continue reading
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Calm birth for first time mother with Domino midwives

Photo courtesy of www.independent.ie

Photo courtesy of http://www.independent.ie

It really was more a case of knowing the type of birth I didn’t want that led me to the decision that I’d try for a natural birth. I have a total fear of the whole needle into your spine thing. So that really put me off the idea of wanting an epidural. Also, knowing you can’t feel any contractions and the increased risk of tearing or having an episiotomy concerned me, too. In my job I’ve waxed hundreds of pregnant clients and heard hundreds of birth stories so I knew that the best-laid plans can change. Continue reading

Choice in Pregnancy and Birth in Ireland

Period late? Feeling tired? Sore breasts? Over emotional? These are all signs of pregnancy. Most mothers choose to further confirm such physical symptoms with a pregnancy test. Once you have a positive pregnancy test then a world of choice presents itself! Where will I have my baby? Who will look after me? How will I find out how to give birth? Should I breastfeed? For the first time mother the choices seem overwhelming and endless, and what makes it all the more confusing is that everyone seems to have a different opinion on what you should do! Continue reading

A second time mum’s birth story with the Coombe community midwives

On Friday morning, six days after my estimated due date, I had a sweep. I was attending the Domino Clinic usually, but was in the public clinic that morning as they wanted me to see a consultant to book me in for induction the following week.  As my first son had been born at 11 days over (in the National Maternity Hospital) I had no trouble convincing them to book the induction for the following wednesday (+11) rather than on the Tuesday, which would have been +10 – policy in the Coombe.  Either way I was confident my boy would arrive before then. Continue reading

First time mum’s positive birth with community midwives in a hospital scheme

It is a little hard to know where to begin with the birth story and how much to share. One thing I’ve learned since having Nate is that sharing experiences with other women is a very powerful tool. In the hours before Nate’s birth, I read several birth stories that gave me the courage and strength I needed to endure the labour. Continue reading